Blessing of Holy Muron

Muron is a Greek word, which means "fragrant oil" or "essence flowing from a plant". The word is derived from the root "to rub", "to anoint". Since the early days of history the olive oil was used together with various fragrant spices. It was widely used by the eastern nations, mainly by the ancient Jews during feast days (Ps. 23:5, Amos 6:6). In the days of Christ the tradition of pouring the ointment on the head or the feet of the guest as a sign of honor was very much alive (Mark 14:3, John 12:3). According to the Divine commandment given to the first prophet Moses (Ex. 30:23-30) the priests of God used the olive oil mixed with extensive, precious, incense, and various spices and flowers. The finest and the most precious of these was the ointment of spikenard (Song of Songs. 1:12, Mark 14:3).

(adapted from Holy Muron, by Hacob Keusseyaan and Vardan Devrikian)

  Once Every Seven Years

 

Holy Muron – 40 Days of Prayer

 His Holiness Karekin II Blesses the ingredients for the Holy Muron

 

 

From the time of the first Catholicos of All Armenians – St. Gregory the Illuminator, the right to bless the Holy Muron (Chrism) has been reserved for the consecrated head of the Church, the Catholicos of All Armenians.

The blessing of the Holy Muron, which traditionally occurs once every seven years, will take place in the Mother See of Holy Etchmiadzin on the Feast of the Holy Cross of Varag, September 28, 2008. His Holiness Karekin II, Supreme Patriarch and Catholicos of All Armenians, will preside and personally offer the service. He will be assisted by twelve archbishops of the Armenian Church from dioceses throughout the world.

Numerous dioceses outside of Armenia have made plans to bring groups of pilgrims to witness and participate in this special event. Several public events are planned during the days before and after the festive service.

 

Ingredients

The Holy Myron is a mixture of pure olive oil and 47 other aromas and flowers. It is prepared only by the Catholicos of the Armenian Apostolic Church during the blessing ceremony of the Holy Myron, which takes place every seven years. During the ceremony, it has become a tradition to mix the new mixture of the Holy Myron with the previous mixture to pass on the blessing and the faith to the next generation. This mixture is then sent to all the Armenian Apostolic Churches around the world to be used in their religious ceremonies.

The Holy Myron is believed to have healing and medicinal properties. The anointment by the Holy Myron symbolises the receiving of the Holy Spirit.

In the past, the Holy Myron was used during the enthroning of Kings and religious leaders. In the Christian faith, the Holy Myron is used in many religious ceremonies and rituals. During Baptism the Holy Myron is placed on a child’s forehead; eyes; ears; nostrils; mouth; hands; heart; back; and feet, as the seal of God and the Holy Spirit. The Holy Myron is used during the ordination of Priests and Bishops, and during the consecration of Churches and Holy sites.

 

The following is a list of the 48 aromas and flowers used to prepare the Holy Myron (Chrism)

English

Balsam oil 

Olive oil 

Carnation 

Nutmeg 

Sweet Flag 

Spikenard 

Gooseberry

Cinnamon

Incense

Cyclamon

Crocus

Sweet Marjoram

Hors elder

Camel's hair

Hazelwort

Camomile

Violet

Water Lily

Orange flower

Allspice

Laurel

Nyrtle

Narcissus

Laurel seed

Armenian

Palasan

Tzet

Mekhag

Mshgenguyze

Pagheshdag

Hntig Nartos

Sev Peran

Tariseng

Khoung

Archedag

Kerkoum

Marzanon 

Geghmough

Vaghmeroug

Merouandag

Yeritsoug

Manishag

Nounoufar

Narnchatzaghig 

Tarabeghbegh

Tapnee

Mourd

Nargiz

Tapnehound

English

Laurel flower

Crystal tea

Ginger

Mastic

Musk

Hyacinth

Orange flower - water

Rose water

Aloes

Cardamon

Sandal 

Rose

Olibanum

Storax

Galingale

Cubeb

Lavender

Rosemary

Lemon balm

Spearmint

Wild mint

Basil

Thyme

Summer Savory

Armenian

Tapnetzaghig

Ladan

Godjabeghbegh

Mazdakeh

Moushg

Hagint

Narinchatzaghigee - chour

Varti chour

Haloueh

Antridag

Jantan

Vart

Gntroug

Sdaghee

Giberis

Hntgabeghbegh

Housam

Khengounee

Tor

Ananoukh

Taghtz

Rahan

Tuem

Tzotrin

For more information, click on the link below.

Etchmiadizin website